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Thread: Class Proposal

  1. #1
    Eggman is offline
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    Class Proposal

    I got to thinking, like I used to do in the old days, maybe the next national would be a good time to schedule a class. Many of us spend most of our N-SSA careers farmed out to competitor's "C" teams. Over time this can have a discouraging effect. The chief cause of this personal conundrum is the dreaded trigger jerk. So my idea is to present a class like on Thursday night aimed directly at this problem. I would call the class, "How to get rid of an Irritating Jerk." Since most of us farmed out folks also have low esteem issues, alongside the jerk class I would also run some self esteem exercises. And of course to maintain confidentiality class attendees would be required to enter the classroom building (probably the HQ building) via the back door.

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    I think the biggest strike against folks in our region is age. I bet most of our guys are 65+. People can't see like they used to, and people get shakier, and they get weaker.

    Except for the eyes, which you can get some optics to deal with, most of this can be dealt with with physical fitness training. Of course I'm only 49 and I'm lazy in that regard myself so it's easier said than done.

    But in my opinion what most folks need is time at the range developing loads that work with known pure lead. For me, the #1 issue for confidence is being able to believe in the gun. Once I believe in the gun and the load, then I simply put the sights where they are supposed to go and that's that. But if I can't count on the gun, then I start second-guessing everything. I start trying to chase bullet holes. This is a recipe for failure. My suspicion is it's mostly the gun/ammo. At least, I can't bring myself to believe that people can't hold a gun steady enough not to keep from hitting the frame, which is done with regularity.

    There is simply no substitute for extensive bench testing until you have at least a 4" group at 50 yards. As our old sharpshooter Chuck Garvey used to say, "If you don't have 4" at 50 yards you ain't got nutthin'." And truly, you ought to have better than that at 50 yards off a bench.

    So if you aren't hitting, first step is bench, bench, bench until you either find a load that works or you give up and get the barrel re-bored or get a new gun. Everything else is irrelevant if the gun won't bench.

    Steve

  3. #3
    Eggman is offline
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    Interesting observations Steve -- probably some good classroom points here. In my view though jerking the trigger has more to do with trying to beat the wobble than the aging process.

  4. #4
    John Holland is offline Moderator
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    Perhaps a Class on "How to Properly Jerk the Trigger, 101", followed by "Controlled Flinch, 102", "Perfected Head Lift, 103", and "Feigned Follow Through, 104" for graduation and a BS Degree in "How to Sort Of Shoot Well"!

  5. #5
    John Bly is offline
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    You just need to apply Cap'n Bly's Shootin 101

    Cap?n Bly?s Shootin? 101
    When ?arf yer bullets fly wide in the ditch

    don?t call yer Musket a cross eyed ol? bitch.
    Thars things ye must pay heed to which,
    breathin? an? sightin? an? for Gawd?s sake don?t twitch.
    Hold ?er steady as she blows an? resist the itch
    to raise yer noggin to see forthwith.
    Let the smoke clear a lit?l an? recover a bit,
    now take a peek to see what yuv hit.
    John D. Bly June 2007
    Didn't copy really well but you get the point.

  6. #6
    John Bly is offline
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    Just substitute apostrophes for all those question marks and it will read correct. Here it is again with a different upload method.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  7. #7
    John Holland is offline Moderator
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    John's paraphrase has made me smile, because I was probably only 10 or 12 years old when I read Kipling's .....

    "When 'arf of your bullets fly wide in the ditch
    Don't call your Martini a cross-eyed old bitch;
    She's human as you are -- you treat her as sich
    An' she'll fight for the young British soldier..."

  8. #8
    jonk is offline
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    Fixing a trigger jerk problem has nothing to do with a class, it has everything to do with practice.

    Assuming you have a smooth trigger with a decent pull, get yourself a rubber cone to put over your nipple and practice dry firing the gun in the house, aiming at something likely, like a door knob. If, after pulling the trigger your sights aren't still on the knob (without the issue of recoil) then you are jerking the trigger, or flinching, or not following through.

    Use the pad of your trigger finger, not the joint.

    Stand with your body not facing the target but somewhat sideways.

    Get some range time with a buddy and have him load the gun for you. Don't look at what he is doing. You don't know if the gun will be loaded or not. Now see if you flinch when it is empty sometimes.

    You sort out what you are doing, then it's practice after that to fix it.

    We all have bad days. If you know your load is good, it's on the shooter or sometimes the gun. Case in point: last skirmish I was at I was shooting around a 70 second hit time. I normally am in the 30s. I wasn't shaking or anything, I knew I was doing my part (and my team mates kept ribbing me saying I was using that as an excuse). Turns out I had a mushroomed nipple that was leaking out a lot of blow by gas and a pile of loose screws in my lock. And a small burr on my sear, though I don't know that that was impacting what I was doing. In short: if you suddenly start missing don't fail to examine the gun, too.

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    PoorJack is offline
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    Your gun has to be capable, as mentioned in a previous post, make sure the mechanical is in proper order. Then it has to have an accurate load. I don't even consider a load to be more than marginal at a 4" group at 50yd. It's got to be tighter.

    Technique can be learned, but not by practicing poor technique. Know your dominant eye. Have someone who knows what to look for watch you shoot. Know your natural point of aim and body position. Practice breathing control. Do a bit of conditioning. Sitting behind a desk all day and then expecting to hold a 9+lb musket steady isn't going to happen. Don't be a couch tater.
    "A man can never have too much red wine, too many books, or too much ammunition"
    Rudyard Kipling


    dave.miller@MuzzleLoadingYouthTraining.org
    NRA Muzzleloading Instructor

  10. #10
    Eggman is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonk View Post
    Fixing a trigger jerk problem has nothing to do with a class, it has everything to do with practice.

    Assuming you have a smooth trigger with a decent pull, get yourself a rubber cone to put over your nipple and practice dry firing the gun in the house, aiming at something likely, like a door knob. If, after pulling the trigger your sights aren't still on the knob (without the issue of recoil) then you are jerking the trigger, or flinching, or not following through.

    Use the pad of your trigger finger, not the joint.

    Stand with your body not facing the target but somewhat sideways.

    Get some range time with a buddy and have him load the gun for you. Don't look at what he is doing. You don't know if the gun will be loaded or not. Now see if you flinch when it is empty sometimes.
    You sort out what you are doing, then it's practice after that to fix it.
    We all have bad days. If you know your load is good, it's on the shooter or sometimes the gun. Case in point: last skirmish I was at I was shooting around a 70 second hit time. I normally am in the 30s. I wasn't shaking or anything, I knew I was doing my part (and my team mates kept ribbing me saying I was using that as an excuse). Turns out I had a mushroomed nipple that was leaking out a lot of blow by gas and a pile of loose screws in my lock. And a small burr on my sear, though I don't know that that was impacting what I was doing. In short: if you suddenly start missing don't fail to examine the gun, too.
    I would submit that a viable curriculum vitae is right here. The instructor need only follow these points to launch class participants onward toward success.
    Another viable suggestion was giving class participants a special badge to wear for quick ingress and egress from the classroom.

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