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Thread: Anomaly during cleaning.

  1. #1
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    Anomaly during cleaning.

    With black powder, i typically clean with home made bore cleaner made of equal parts of hydrogen peroxide, Murphy's oil soap, and isopropyl alcohol. I then follow with a dry patch, then a patch of WD-40 to displace any moisture left from the peroxide, and finally a oil patch to prevent rust. Sometimes, after getting perfectly clean patches of bore cleaner and dry ones, the WD-40 patch comes out dirty grey. So what is WD-40 getting out that the bore cleaner did not? Doesn't happen all the time, but sometimes.

  2. #2
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    ​More then likely traces of lead.
    Ron S.
    Formerly 6587V
    NRA Benefactor-Life
    Of all the things that I have lost it's my mind I miss the most.
    Great Grandson of William Gibson ( Canal boat builder ) ( 1862 Militia South Mountain )
    ( Co. C 116 Infantry, 106th Pennsylvania Regiment, Gettysburg
    Rev.22:20 - 1 Thessalonians 4: 16-17 The Best Is yet To Come



  3. #3
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    I wondered about that Ron. When I wrote that, I was going from memory, but I shot skeet with an old side by side yesterday that I only use black powder shells in. I was getting white wet patches. I used one dry patch to soak up any bore cleaner left in the bore. Then a WD-40 patch which came out light grey, but I said "Good enough" and put an oil patch down the bore and it came out black. I couldn't believe it. I will say that this old shotgun has some pits in the bore, but you'd think powder residue in pits would still show up on patches saturated with bore cleaner. It's got me baffled.

  4. #4
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    The last time I heard this term was in a conversation with Bob Propst. I said, "Boy, that Lani Harrison can really shoot!" Bob said, "No, he's an anomaly."

  5. #5
    Jim_Burgess_2078V is offline
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    Cleaning Solution

    I won't discount the possibility the dark gray patches you are getting might be indicative of lead fouling but you really should not be getting any significant lead fouling at the velocities we normally shoot. When I first began skirmishing in the early 1970s teammates recommended I use a mixture of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), Lestoil and ammonia (NH3) to clean my musket. I used a small amount of the solution (half cup) in a bucket with hot water for several years but then the glass bottle in which I kept a small supply of the mixture exploded (mildly) all by itself (some kind of chemical reaction that generated gas pressure). I stopped using the H2O2 after that and continue to just use a half cup of Lestoil and ammonia in a 4:1 ratio in a gallon of hot water. After cleaning and before oiling I also use a WD-40 soaked patch to mitigate any residual moisture in the bore. That patch always comes out clean and can be recycled. I have since learned that H2O2 can also expedite oxidation (rust) on ferrous alloys. It certainly will cut black powder fouling nicely but I have found it is not absolutely essential. The H2O2 may be contributing to your anomaly.

    Jim Burgess, 15th C.V.I.

  6. #6
    Tom Kelley, 6649V is offline
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    the patches?

    Are all your patches from the same material? or cut from bits and pieces? It could be a chemical reaction to the patch itself. BTW I use 1:1 HO and Isopropyl and .1 Murphys.

    Good luck with it.

  7. #7
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    A long time ago, a friend of mine bought one of those de-leading devices where you fill the barrel with some sort of solution and immerse an electrode down the bore. He was so amazed at the amount of lead it removed from his modern firearms that he'd been shooting with cast bullets, that he offered to clean one of my muskets. I'm sure he wanted to impress me, and I let gave him a Parker-Hale two-band that I'd shot for about a decade. When he gave it back to me he seemed disappointed that he didn't find any lead in the barrel. I don't know if the device was made to handle bigger bores, but it seems odd that he didn't find anything.

    I think leading problems may happen in sharp, deep fast rifling, but shooting minies out of a normal musket at velocities around 900 fps doesn't seem to cause leading problems. The gray on the WD-40 patches might be a reaction with residue from a previously used solvent, or something a previously used solvent didn't clean. I use the Murphy's Oil Soap/Alcohol/Peroxide to clean, but quit using WD-40 shortly after I discovered Kroil.
    Gary Van Kauwenbergh
    Co G, 114th ILL Vol Inf
    # 10143

    "Alle Kunst ist umsonst Wenn ein Engel in das Zündloch prunst."
    (In vain the skill and arts of man, When an angel pisses the priming pan.)
    Field Marshal Gebhard L. von Blücher

  8. #8
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    The patches are store bought gun cleaning patches. I've never noticed this on my musket, but I have on my smoothbore and more recently a Merrill carbine I'm messing with. The one I get it on every time is this old shotgun. Like I say, it has pits and I suspect that is where some fouling is hiding, but it's strange that I can get clean wet patches out, but one with oil or WD-40 is bringing out more fouling that the bore cleaner didn't get.

  9. #9
    Jim Brady Knap's Battery is offline
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    I have noticed the effect more with original iron barrels that with modern steel barrels. Probably because even on a shiny original bore there is more porosity that on a modern steel one.
    Last edited by Jim Brady Knap's Battery; 2 Weeks Ago at 04:48 PM.
    Jim Brady
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  10. #10
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    Is it possibe this could be happening because a lot of barrels are made from 12L14 leaded steel?

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