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Thread: CS Box Plates

  1. #1
    Gray Ghost is offline
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    CS Box Plates

    Would someone out there be so kind as to tell me when CS box plates started showing up on cartridge boxes during the war? Did they show up early, late and what areas of operation would they be appropriate for?
    Thanks.
    Larry

  2. #2
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    I think this can only be answered in generalities as I have seen no scholorly study on this specific subject. The vast overwhelming majority of CS cartridge boxes had NO boxplates. The very few that I have seen (I have owned one) were of eastern origin and were a realitively early box. I'm sure there may have been western examples, but again, box plates were not a CS priotiry and few were made.

    By the way, The CS box plate that has been reproduced since the 1960s and has a CS belt plate that matches are not copies of any specific originals. They were created by vendors during the early days of reenacting.
    Mark Hubbs,

    Eras Gone Bullet Molds www.erasgonebullets.webstarts.com

    Visit my history/archaeology blog at: www.erasgone.blogspot.com

  3. #3
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    On the subject of Confederate cartridge boxes, what about the stamped CS in the leather? When was that used and how extensively? Sorry if i'm "hijacking" the thread, but the whole Confederate cartridge box topic is one on which info seems pretty sparse.

    TIA ~Froggie
    Charlie Shaeff
    1st Valley Rangers
    N-SSA # 12345

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    Very few original boxes had anything pressed into the flap. If they did it was usually makers names. Heck, most had no markings at all!

    The link below is to Jarnagan's catalog on CS leather. This is not an adverstisment, but a good source to see what some CS boxes looked like. David Jarnagan, besides being an excellent leather worker, is a great researcher and a memeber of the Company of Military Historians. He probably knows more about Civil War leather than anyone. Most of the CS boxes he sells are those with markings, only because they sell the best. Folks will by the marked boxes over generic unmarked CS boxes

    http://www.jarnaginco.com/confedcatframe.html
    Mark Hubbs,

    Eras Gone Bullet Molds www.erasgonebullets.webstarts.com

    Visit my history/archaeology blog at: www.erasgone.blogspot.com

  5. #5
    Southron Sr. is offline
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    Cartridge Box Plates

    Another factor to keep in mind that argues against the widespread use of stamped or cast "CS" or "CSA" cartridge box plates is the relative scarcity of copper and brass in the Confederacy from the mid-point of the war on.

    After Union forces advanced past the Copper Hill area of Tennessee in 1863, (where the copper mines were located),there was a severe shortage of both copper and brass in the Confederacy.

    Matter of fact, towards the end of the war Confederate Ordnance authorities were seizing copper moonshine stills in the mountains of North Georgia because the copper was desperately needed to manufacture percussion caps. Brass became so scarce that the Tredegar foundry in Richmond had to resort to casting Napoleon cannon out of iron rather than brass as had formerly been done.

    So, the Confederacy could ill afford to use very scarce brass for simply a decorative (and otherwise useless) items such as cartridge box plates.

  6. I have 3 CS boxes on this page if you want to look. http://www.angelfire.com/ma4/j_mayo/csequip.html

    As for CS box plates, back in the 1970s I ran into a fella who lived near the Angle in Spottyslvania. He had several CS box plates that he had dug in the area (along with about a ton and a half of CS buttons). CS boxes using the plates were rare as were the CS embossed boxes.

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    All,

    While searching for information on Confederate Cartridge Box Plates for this post by Gray Ghost, I came upon this entry in a book titled "The Army of Northern Virginia" by Philip Katcher & Michael Youens, through google books. Under the section titled "Arms and Accoutrements" an English observer noted what each Infantryman carried. Found it interesting, and there is also other previews of this book listed. Here is the link that will take you directly to that section. Sorry for the long link.

    http://books.google.com/books?id=RN_EHF ... te&f=false
    Francis J. Miller Jr. (Herb)
    Lancaster Fencibles/79th PVI
    Middle Atlantic Region
    153-MA - 02601V
    Middle Atlantic Region Deputy Provost Marshal
    N-SSA National Provost Guard

  8. #8
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    Beware of Osprey books, especially those by English authors writing on American subjects. I've seen that particular book and it is filled with generalities and few footnotes as to sources.

    On the very page is one of the biggest misconceptions on CS cartridge box finials. It claims that brass was rare and most were wood or lead. I've seen lead, pewter and iron, but most are actually bass on original boxes.
    Mark Hubbs,

    Eras Gone Bullet Molds www.erasgonebullets.webstarts.com

    Visit my history/archaeology blog at: www.erasgone.blogspot.com

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by threepdr
    Beware of Osprey books, especially those by English authors writing on American subjects. I've seen that particular book and it is filled with generalities and few footnotes as to sources.

    On the very page is one of the biggest misconceptions on CS cartridge box finials. It claims that brass was rare and most were wood or lead. I've seen lead, pewter and iron, but most are actually bass on original boxes.

    I totally agree with this post.
    Chris Hubbard
    146th New York Volunteer Infantry (ACWSA)

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